British man rewarded $150k after routine haircut triggers blood clot and stroke

You never think that the simple act of getting your hair cut will wind up becoming a life-threatening experience, but that’s just what happened to one British man.

As reported by Agence France Presse, Dave Tyler, a 45-year-old father of two, suffered a stroke after an artery was damaged during a routine haircut, with the salon awarding him $150,000 in compensation.

Tyler collapsed just two days after his haircut during a business meeting, witnesses said, which of course prompted a trip to the hospital. There, a health care consultant actually asked, “Have you had your hair cut recently?”

He said he had his hair washed and cut at a salon called Headmaster in his home town of Brighton, in southern England, The Times reported just recently.

‘Beauty Parlor Syndrome’

Doctors said they believe that an artery may have been injured when Tyler’s head was bent backwards over the wash basin. This may have led to “beauty parlor syndrome,” a rare condition in which an injured artery then causes a clot to form that can lead to debilitating strokes like the one Tyler experienced.

The reports said Tyler spent three months in the hospital after his stroke learning how to walk. Now he must use a walking stick and can no longer drive because his vision is permanently blurred.

The salon agreed to pay the settlement after Tyler’s lawyers claimed the shop failed to adequately protect his head during the visit in 2011.

Tyler certainly is not the first one to be this unfortunate simply for getting a haircut. The Times noted further that similar incidents have been documented in medical journals; the report cited two additional cases of beauty parlor syndrome.

In January 2014 Elizabeth Smith, mother of two, suffered a stroke while visiting a salon in San Diego, California. Earlier, in 2000, Pamela Crabb from Poole, in southern England, also suffered a stroke that health care experts believe was caused by a visit to a hair salon.

Sources:

CTVNews.ca

TheTimes.co.uk

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